Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Retail jobs in Jacksonville grow

Thursday, March 7th, 2019

Many more retail jobs in Jacksonville have been added, according to recent labor statistics.

Employment increased by 304,000 in January, and the unemployment rate edged up to 4.0 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

In January, employment grew in several industries, including leisure and hospitality, construction, health care, and transportation and warehousing.

In January, employment in leisure and hospitality rose by 74,000. Within the industry, job gains occurred in food services and drinking places (+37,000) and in amusements, gambling, and recreation (+32,000).

Over the year, leisure and hospitality has added 410,000 jobs. Construction employment rose by 52,000 in January. Job gains occurred among specialty trade contractors, with increases in both the nonresidential (+19,000) and residential (+15,000) components.

Employment also rose in heavy and civil engineering construction (+10,000) and residential building (+9,000). Construction has added 338,000 jobs over the past 12 months. Employment in health care increased by 42,000 in January. Within the industry, job gains occurred in ambulatory health care services (+22,000) and hospitals (+19,000).

Health care has added 368,000 jobs over the past year. Over the month, employment in transportation and warehousing rose by 27,000, following little change in December. In January, job gains occurred in warehousing and storage (+15,000) and among couriers and messengers (+7,000). Over the year, employment in transportation and warehousing has increased by 219,000.

In January, retail trade employment edged up by 21,000. Job gains occurred in sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores (+17,000), while general merchandise stores lost jobs (-12,000).

Employment in retail trade has shown little net change over the past 12 months (+26,000). Mining employment increased by 7,000 in January.

The industry has added 64,000 jobs over the year, almost entirely in support activities for mining. Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up over the month (+30,000) and has increased by 546,000 in the past 12 months.

Employment in manufacturing continued to trend up in January (+13,000). Over-the- month job gains occurred in durable goods (+20,000), while employment in nondurable goods changed little (-7,000). Manufacturing employment has increased by 261,000 over the year, with more than four-fifths of the gain in durable goods industries.

Getting STEM jobs in Jacksonville

Wednesday, February 27th, 2019

Many graduates getting STEM jobs in Jacksonville may see a big difference in their salaries.

Bachelor’s degree graduates earning STEM degrees are expected to earn the highest starting salaries from the college Class of 2019, according to results of a new survey from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

NACE’s Winter 2019 Salary Survey found that graduates with engineering ($69,188), computer science ($67,539), and math and sciences degrees ($62,177) are once again projected to be the top-paid graduates.

Also coming in near the top of the list are business ($57,657) and social sciences ($57,310) majors.

The news is generally positive for Class of 2019 graduates overall at this early juncture in the salary reporting cycle.

All reported disciplines are expected to see gains—albeit relatively small ones—except one and that loss is just -0.1 percent.

Agriculture and natural resources majors are projected to see the greatest gain in starting salary at 4.1 percent.

With an expected increase of 4.0 percent, engineering majors follow closely behind, while the average salary for computer science majors is anticipated to be 2.3 percent more than their counterparts from the Class of 2018.

The Winter 2019 Salary Survey contains annual salary projections for Class of 2019 college graduates. The figures reported are for base salaries only and do not include bonuses, commissions, fringe benefits, or overtime rates.

 

Technologies match job seekers to Jacksonville jobs

Monday, February 25th, 2019

A variety of new technologies are available matching Jacksonville jobs to job seekers, according to a recent survey from Careerbuilder.

While the majority of millennial hiring managers (59 percent) strongly agree that technology will reduce recruiters’ roles in their companies’ talent acquisition processes over the next five years, hiring managers across all generations are keen to leverage the data staffing firms can provide, including salary data and industry hiring trends.

In the current market, hiring managers’ primary reasons for working with staffing firms include the desire to shorten the hiring process (42 percent) and access to candidates with specialized skills (41 percent), yet 40 percent of companies maintain recruitment processes in-house to save money.

Additional key findings include:

  • Companies partner with staffing firms to improve and streamline hiring processes, and most are not exclusively partnered with one firm.
    • Fifty-four percent of hiring managers plan to increase their use of staffing firms over the next five years.
    • Hiring managers cite top pain points in the recruitment process as access to candidates with the right skills (52 percent), time to hire (40 percent), and budget (34 percent).
    • Sixty-six percent of hiring managers feel using a staffing firm would be very helpful in gaining access to the right candidates.
    • According to hiring managers, the key reasons for working with staffing firms include that they needed to hire someone more quickly than they could do on their own (42 percent), access to candidates with specialized skills (41 percent), and they had a hard time filling the position on their own (37 percent).
    • The main reasons hiring managers do not work with staffing firms are that they were trying to save money (40 percent), staffing agencies are not hiring the type of positions needed (28 percent), and they believe the best candidates do not work with staffing agencies (26 percent).
  • Staffing firms must be up-to-date on the technology they use.
    • Sixty-seven percent of hiring managers believe it is very or extremely important for their staffing firms to use up-to-date technology.
    • Seventy-four percent of hiring managers believe using up-to-date technology can help differentiate a staffing firm.
    • At staffing firms, leaders cite inconsistent use of systems as their biggest frustration with technologies (31 percent), while at the field level, main frustrations can be attributed to outdated candidate data (29 percent).
    • Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) are ranked as the most valuable technology used by staffing firms (31 percent), followed by social media sites (19 percent) and job boards (15 percent); however, both leadership and field workers at staffing firms believe that ATS technologies are in the most need of improvement.
    • The most common resources used include technologies to match open jobs to potential candidates (45 percent), use of a single search bar to look at multiple third-party resume databases (40 percent), and video or online interviewing capabilities (38 percent).
  • Hiring managers are made aware of new staffing firms through a variety of different sources including the firm’s reputation within their industry (12 percent), proactive recommendations (12 percent), and through experience hiring with the firm at a previous job (12 percent).
    • The primary resources companies use when vetting new staffing firms are similar to how they initially learn about these agencies, and include asking people in their professional networks for referrals (34 percent), the firm’s reputation within the industry (34 percent), and reading the staffing firm’s website (27 percent).
    • Main reasons for selecting a primary staffing firm include the firm’s ability to find specific or niche skill sets (16 percent), strong reputations (15 percent), and the ability to find high quality talent (15 percent).
  • Most staffing firm leaders have seen revenue increases over the past year (66 percent).

Construction jobs in Jacksonville climb

Saturday, February 9th, 2019

Several more construction jobs in Jacksonville have been added.

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 304,000 in January, and the unemployment rate edged up to 4.0 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

In January, employment in leisure and hospitality rose by 74,000. Within the industry, job gains occurred in food services and drinking places (+37,000) and in amusements, gambling, and recreation (+32,000). Over the year, leisure and hospitality has added 410,000 jobs.

Construction employment rose by 52,000 in January. Job gains occurred among specialty trade contractors, with increases in both the nonresidential (+19,000) and residential (+15,000) components.

Employment also rose in heavy and civil engineering construction (+10,000) and residential building (+9,000). Construction has added 338,000 jobs over the past 12 months. Employment in health care increased by 42,000 in January.

Within the industry, job gains occurred in ambulatory health care services (+22,000) and hospitals (+19,000). Health care has added 368,000 jobs over the past year.

Over the month, employment in transportation and warehousing rose by 27,000, following little change in December. In January, job gains occurred in warehousing and storage (+15,000) and among couriers and messengers (+7,000). Over the year, employment in transportation and warehousing has increased by 219,000.

In January, retail trade employment edged up by 21,000. Job gains occurred in sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores (+17,000), while general merchandise stores lost jobs (-12,000). Employment in retail trade has shown little net change over the past 12 months (+26,000).

Mining employment increased by 7,000 in January. The industry has added 64,000 jobs over the year, almost entirely in support activities for mining. Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up over the month (+30,000) and has increased by 546,000 in the past 12 months.

Employers increasing college hiring in Jacksonville

Tuesday, January 29th, 2019

Employers may be increasing college hiring in Jacksonville, according to a recent labor survey.

Employers expect to hire 16.6 percent more new graduates from the Class of 2019 than they did from the Class of 2018 for positions in the United States, according to results of a recent survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

Another indication of the strength of the current job market for college graduates is the fact that 96 percent of employers plan to maintain or increase their hiring. Over the past three recruiting years, the largest group of employers responding to the Job Outlook survey expected to maintain their individual hiring numbers. That trend continues this year as 57.4 percent of employers plan to keep their number of college hires the same.

While 38.6 percent of responding employers plan to increase their hires, perhaps the most encouraging finding is that just 4 percent of respondents will decrease their hires. This represents less than half of last year’s respondents (9.6 percent) that planned to decrease hires, and it is the smallest group with these plans in the past seven years.

Respondents that expect to increase their new college hiring provided key factors for doing so that yielded common—almost universal—themes, such as an improved economy, company growth, anticipated retirements, and a focus on early talent/succession planning. Several others in this group reported that they plan to concentrate on converting more interns to full-time hires, thus increasing their overall hiring numbers.

Most of the respondents that are maintaining their new college hiring numbers indicated that the growth in their respective companies is steady, so they have no need to increase or decrease their numbers. Other respondents reported that they hired aggressively in the past few years, so they will maintain college hiring at their current levels.

Those looking for Jacksonville STEM jobs may get high salaries

Sunday, January 27th, 2019

Gradates looking for Jacksonville STEM jobs, among other locations, may be granted higher salaries than their counterparts.

Bachelor’s degree graduates earning STEM degrees are expected to earn the highest starting salaries from the college Class of 2019, according to results of a new survey from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

 

Graduates with engineering ($69,188), computer science ($67,539), and math and sciences degrees ($62,177) are once again projected to be the top-paid graduates.

Also coming in near the top of the list are business ($57,657) and social sciences ($57,310) majors.

The news is generally positive for Class of 2019 graduates overall at this early juncture in the salary reporting cycle. All reported disciplines are expected to see gains—albeit relatively small ones—except one and that loss is just -0.1 percent.

Agriculture and natural resources majors are projected to see the greatest gain in starting salary at 4.1 percent.

With an expected increase of 4.0 percent, engineering majors follow closely behind, while the average salary for computer science majors is anticipated to be 2.3 percent more than their counterparts from the Class of 2018.

Employers plan to hire more for Jacksonville jobs

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019

Employers will be hiring more for Jacksonville jobs in the future, according to a recent hiring survey.

Employers expect to hire 16.6 percent more new graduates from the Class of 2019 than they did from the Class of 2018 for positions in the United States, according to results of a recent survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

This year marks the best initial hiring outlook since the Class of 2007.

Over the past three recruiting years, the largest group of employers responding to the Job Outlook survey expected to maintain their individual hiring numbers. That trend continues this year as 57.4 percent of employers plan to keep their number of college hires the same.

While 38.6 percent of responding employers plan to increase their hires, perhaps the most encouraging finding is that just 4 percent of respondents will decrease their hires. This represents less than half of last year’s respondents (9.6 percent) that planned to decrease hires, and it is the smallest group with these plans in the past seven years.

Respondents that expect to increase their new college hiring provided key factors for doing so that yielded common—almost universal—themes, such as an improved economy, company growth, anticipated retirements, and a focus on early talent/succession planning. Several others in this group reported that they plan to concentrate on converting more interns to full-time hires, thus increasing their overall hiring numbers.

Most of the respondents that are maintaining their new college hiring numbers indicated that the growth in their respective companies is steady, so they have no need to increase or decrease their numbers. Other respondents reported that they hired aggressively in the past few years, so they will maintain college hiring at their current levels.

 

Manufacturing jobs in Jacksonville climb

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019

A number of manufacturing jobs in Jacksonville have grown, according to recent labor statistics.

Employment increased by 155,000 in November, and the unemployment rate remained unchanged at 3.7 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. Job gains occurred in health care, in manufacturing, and in transportation and warehousing.

In November, the unemployment rate was 3.7 percent for the third month in a row, and the number of unemployed persons was little changed at 6.0 million. Over the year, the unemployment rate and the number of unemployed persons declined by 0.4 percentage point and 641,000, respectively.

Payroll employment increased by 155,000 in November, compared with an average monthly gain of 209,000 over the prior 12 months. In November, job gains occurred in health care, in manufacturing, and in transportation and warehousing. (See table B-1.) Health care employment rose by 32,000 in November.

Within the industry, job gains occurred in ambulatory health care services (+19,000) and hospitals (+13,000). Over the year, health care has added 328,000 jobs. In November, manufacturing added 27,000 jobs, with increases in chemicals (+6,000) and primary metals (+3,000).

Manufacturing employment has increased by 288,000 over the year, largely in durable goods industries. Employment in transportation and warehousing rose by 25,000 in November. Job gains occurred in couriers and messengers (+10,000) and in warehousing and storage (+6,000). Over the year, transportation and warehousing has added 192,000 jobs. In November, employment in professional and business services continued on an upward trend (+32,000). The industry has added 561,000 jobs over the year.

Retail trade employment changed little in November (+18,000). Job growth occurred in general merchandise stores (+39,000) and miscellaneous store retailers (+10,000).

These gains were offset, in part, by declines in clothing and clothing accessories stores (-14,000); electronics and appliance stores(-11,000); and sporting goods, hobby, and book stores (-11,000).

Employment in other major industries–including mining, construction, wholesale trade, information, financial activities, leisure and hospitality, and government–showed little change over the month.

 

Target hires for customer service jobs in Jacksonville

Tuesday, November 27th, 2018

One company is hiring for the holidays, which may include customer service jobs in Jacksonville.

Target plans to hire approximately 120,000 seasonal team members across the country for the upcoming holiday season, a 20 percent increase over last year’s hiring commitment.

In addition, the company will continue to offer extra hours to current team members to accommodate their interest and availability.

The announcement is a continuation of the company’s investment in team members that includes increased hourly wages, benefits and discounts, and meaningful opportunities to build experience and skills. Seasonal team members are an integral part of Target’s efforts to ensure its 1,839 stores provide guests with a fun and easy holiday shopping experience.

Target’s commitment to increasing its minimum hourly wage to $15 per hour by the end of 2020. In addition, seasonal team members will be able to take advantage of other benefits, including:

  • A 10 percent discount at Target stores and Target.com
  • An additional 20 percent merchandise wellness discount on fruits and vegetables and all Simply Balanced and C9 Champion merchandise
  • The opportunity to earn holiday pay on Thanksgiving and Christmas
  • Flexible schedules that allow team members to work a variety of hours

Target also is investing more than $2 million to reward team members working during the busy holiday season as part of its work.win.give. appreciation program. One hourly team member from each of Target’s more than 1,800 stores and 39 distribution centers across the country will be randomly selected to receive a $500 holiday gift card and an opportunity to donate $500 to the local community organization of their choice.

Holiday hiring looks decent for Jacksonville jobs

Tuesday, November 27th, 2018

A new survey from Challenger, Gray & Christmas shows that holiday hiring may be solid for Jacksonville jobs.

Retailers and logistics companies are gearing up for a huge shopping season in light of a solid economy and high consumer confidence. This will translate into more jobs added for seasonal hiring, according to the survey.

Macy’s announced it will hire 80,000 seasonal workers, the same number as last year. Macy’s eventually hired another 7,000 seasonal workers in December. FedEx likewise announced it is looking for 55,000 workers, 5,000 more than last year.

“Retailers have been aggressively hiring seasonal workers since July to combat the tight job market. This holiday season will be a good time for workers who have had trouble finding employment or those who are discouraged or marginally attached to the labor force, as retail, transport, and warehousing jobs will be plentiful,” said Andrew Challenger, Vice President of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

Last year, seasonal retail employment increased by 668,400 during the final three months of the year, 4.3 percent higher than the 641,000 jobs added in 2016, according to employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

“Seasonal jobs are no longer in retail alone. With the rise of online shopping, transport and warehousing companies are also looking for seasonal workers. We’ve seen this trend over the last few years,” said Challenger.

Last year, BLS data showed that transportation and warehousing employment increased by a non-seasonally adjusted 279,700, up 13.4 percent from the 246,700 workers in the final quarter of 2016 and 6.6 percent higher than the 262,300 workers hired in this sector in the final three months of 2015.

Companies in this sector are averaging 5.2 million workers this year, compared to 4.9 million in 2015 and 4.2 million in 2008, according to non-seasonally adjusted BLS data.