Archive for August, 2016

How to stand out for Jacksonville jobs

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

There are many ways a job seeker can stand out for Jacksonville jobs, according to a press release from Careerbuilder.

Five ways include:

  • Don’t forget the past: Giving a few examples of how your past experience is transferrable shows that you’ve thought through how you would fit in to the organization.
  • Use social media to your advantage: Tweeting, blogging and commenting about things you know builds up your credibility online. When an employer searches your name after an interview, you want them to find a knowledgeable individual who can fit well into their company.
  • Ask questions: Be sure to prepare a few good questions of your own. Want to know what the corporate culture is like? Are you curious about opportunities to advance? Your questions communicate to your interviewer what’s most important to you. They can also position you as a solid candidate for the role and set you apart from the competition.
  • Showcase your numbers: Use as many facts and figures as you can when promoting yourself. How many people were impacted by your work? By what percentage did you exceed your goals?
  • Send a note: If you feel the interview has gone well and you want to continue pursuing the opportunity, let the interviewer know. Tell him or her that you’ve enjoyed the interview; you believe you can thrive in the role, and you are interested in exploring the next step.

Finance jobs in Jacksonville grow

Monday, August 8th, 2016

The number of finance jobs in Jacksonville have grown, according to recent statistics from the Bureau of Labor.

The unemployment rate held at 4.9 percent in July, and the number of unemployed persons was essentially unchanged at 7.8 million. Both measures have shown little movement, on net, since August of last year.

In July, the number of persons unemployed less than 5 weeks decreased by 258,000. At 2.0 million, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was about unchanged over the month and accounted for 26.6 percent of the unemployed.

Both the labor force participation rate, at 62.8 percent, and the employment-population ratio, at 59.7 percent, changed little in July. The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed at 5.9 million in July. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

Among the marginally attached, there were 591,000 discouraged workers in July, little different from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.4 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in July had not searched for work for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities.

In July, health care employment increased by 43,000, with gains in ambulatory health care services (+19,000), hospitals (+17,000), and nursing and residential care facilities (+7,000). Over the past 12 months, health care has added 477,000 jobs.

Jacksonville jobs and the Skills Economy

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

A new report from Payscale takes a look at Jacksonville jobs, among other locations, and the skills economy.

Payscale highlighted this in a report called “Leveling Up: How to Win In the Skills Economy,” the 2016 Workforce-Skills Preparedness Report.

The report—which includes several animated 8-bit infographics in the style of early video games—details the disconnect between managers and recent graduates regarding their preparedness for employment after entering the workforce, and which skills managers are most likely to consider absent or deficient. It also details which skills are most likely to result in a larger salary, which skills are most likely to result in a promotion, which skills are least valuable (best to leave off your resume), and which skills are most common by geographic region of the United States.

“We hear all the time about the ‘skills gap,’ the gap between the skills needed to succeed in the professional world and the skills with which young professionals leave college,” said Katie Bardaro, VP of Data Analytics, PayScale. “The data we’ve collected show that even though their education may make recent college graduates feel prepared to enter the workforce, only half of hiring managers agree with them; managers feel crucial skills in recent graduates are frequently lacking or absent.”

One unexpected finding was the specific skills that managers feel are most often lacking in new hires right out of college. Rather than specific software programs or other tech skills, the report indicates that 44 percent of managers feel writing proficiency is the hard skill lacking the most among recent college graduates, while public speaking follows with 39 percent of managers feeling this way. Furthermore, 60 percent of managers feel critical thinking/problem solving is the soft skill lacking the most among recent college graduates.