Will people be looking for new Jacksonville jobs?

May 23rd, 2019

Some people may be looking for new Jacksonville jobs, according to a recent survey from Monster.com.

One in three (33%) Americans plan on looking for a new job this year

  • This is even higher among 18-34-year-olds: 48% plan to look for a new job this year
  • Ninety percent of those planning to look for a new job expect to do so within the first three months of 2019
  • While 54% believe the process would be easy if they had to look for a new job tomorrow, the other half of Americans (46%) believe it would be hard

Three-quarters (75%) of Americans have had a job where they didn’t feel they were a good fit

  • Half (51%) of Americans have felt this way in 2 or more jobs
  • Among those who have felt like a bad fit at a job, only 14% were able to tell right away when they started. For many it took weeks (41%) or months (39%)
  • Nearly all Americans (95%) agree that overall fit is important when it comes to their happiness at work—with 62% believing it is very important

Another three-quarters of Americans think that video will play a role in job searching in the future

  • Seventy-two percent anticipate video in the future job search, but expected uses vary:
    • Video call with recruiters/potential employers in the interview process: 36%
    • Video resume: 33%
    • Video job description: 27%
    • Video application submission: 25%
    • Video featuring a recruiter describing a job ad: 22%
  • Younger Americans (83% 18-34-year-olds) are more likely to see a role for video in the job search process than older Americans (64% 35-65-year-olds)
  • Eighty percent of Americans agree a video of a recruiter talking about a role as part of a job ad would help them better understand a job opportunity
  • Thirty-two percent of Americans do not believe that a traditional resume adequately conveys their value to employers—and this is substantially higher among older Americans (48% 55-65-year-olds)

Healthcare jobs in Jacksonville climb

May 5th, 2019

More healthcare jobs in Jacksonville have been added, according to the latest labor statistics.

Employment increased by 263,000 in April, compared with an average monthly gain of 213,000 over the prior 12 months. In April, notable jobs gains occurred in professional and business services, construction, health care, and social assistance.

Professional and business services added 76,000 jobs in April. Within the industry, employment gains occurred in administrative and support services (+53,000) and in computer systems design and related services (+14,000).

Over the past 12 months, professional and business services has added 535,000 jobs. In April, construction employment rose by 33,000, with gains in nonresidential specialty trade contractors (+22,000) and in heavy and civil engineering construction (+10,000). Construction has added 256,000 jobs over the past 12 months.

Employment in health care grew by 27,000 in April and 404,000 over the past 12 months. In April, job growth occurred in ambulatory health care services (+17,000), hospitals (+8,000), and community care facilities for the elderly (+7,000). Social assistance added 26,000 jobs over the month, with all of the gain in individual and family services.

Financial activities employment continued to trend up in April (+12,000).

The industry has added 110,000 jobs over the past 12 months, with almost three- fourths of the growth in real estate and rental and leasing. Manufacturing employment changed little for the third month in a row (+4,000 in April).

In the 12 months prior to February, the industry had added an average of 22,000 jobs per month.

Employment in retail trade changed little in April (-12,000). Job losses occurred in general merchandise stores (-9,000), while motor vehicle and parts dealers added 8,000 jobs.

Employment in other major industries, including mining, wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, information, leisure and hospitality, and government, showed little change over the month.

Would act result in Jacksonville job loss?

April 28th, 2019

A new act that is being proposed regarding wages could hurt Jacksonville jobs, among other locations across the United States, according to a forecast from NFIB.

The Raise the Wage Act (H.R. 582 & S. 150) would lead to massive job losses, lost production, and income reduction on a national scale, according to a newly released economic forecast from the NFIB Research Center.

If the bill becomes law, there would be approximately 1.6 million fewer jobs in the United States in 2029, with more than half of those private sector losses taking place at small businesses, according to the forecast.

The cumulative real output loss, as a result of the Raise the Wage Act becoming law, would exceed $2.0 trillion, and the cumulative real GDP loss would exceed $980 billion over the ten-year forecast window. Americans will have $103 billion less in disposable personal income in 2029, the forecast states.

Small businesses would be particularly hurt by the Raise the Wage Act, according to the forecast. More than 900,000 jobs would be lost, or 57 percent of all private sector job losses, at companies with fewer than 500 employees. Nearly 700,000 jobs would be lost, about 43 percent of all jobs lost, at businesses with fewer than 100 employees.

“The negative impact of the proposed legislation would fall disproportionately on small employers, which are less likely to have the cash reserves or profit margins to absorb the increase in labor costs than larger businesses,” states the study, “Economic Effects of Enacting the Raise the Wage Act on Small Businesses and the U.S. Economy.”

The employment reduction in retail, food service, and administrative support industries account for more than 392,000 lost jobs, or approximately 24 percent of total forecast jobs lost. The retail trade industry is forecast to have more than 162,000 fewer jobs by 2029. Food services and drinking places would have more than 165,000 fewer jobs and administrative and support services would see a decline of more than 85,000 jobs.

Are workers being promoted at Jacksonville jobs?

April 28th, 2019

The state of promotions and retention at Jacksonville jobs and other jobs around the world is discussed in a new report.

The ADP Research Institute released the 2019 State of the Workforce Report: Pay, Promotions and Retention.  The study provides comprehensive, data-driven organizational benchmarks derived from the aggregated and anonymized actual HR and payroll data of U.S. workers.

The inaugural report shares pay, promotion, and hierarchy insights, inclusive of all industries and firm sizes of at least 50 employees. The results are further examined by age, gender, firm size, and tenure.

The report uncovers key insights pertaining to business leaders and the HR community at large. It was designed to help employers gain a better understanding of the hierarchical structure of organizations, pay levels, how pay and promotions are connected and how employers retain workers throughout their organizations.

Based on payroll from more than 13 million employees, the research provides details about how firm hierarchy, promotions, turnover and span of control is vital to understanding relevant labor market trends.

Many of the key findings from the inaugural study focus on promotional activities, a topic of great importance to younger employees focused on career opportunities. Overall, employers promote 8.9 percent of their employees annually and those employees received an average wage increase of 17.4 percent. Interestingly, however, promotions within a team are associated with higher turnover among other team members.  Firms are more likely to promote internal employees for management positions, and the percentage of internal hires increase for higher levels in the organization.

Construction jobs in Jacksonville added

April 7th, 2019

More construction jobs in Jacksonville have been added, according to recent labor statistics.

Employment increased by 196,000 in March, with notable gains in health care and in professional and technical services. Employment growth averaged 180,000 per month in the first quarter of 2019, compared with 223,000 per month in 2018.

Health care added 49,000 jobs in March and 398,000 over the past 12 months.

Over the month, employment increased in ambulatory health care services (+27,000), hospitals (+14,000), and nursing and residential care facilities (+9,000). Employment in professional and technical services grew by 34,000 in March and 311,000 over the past 12 months. In March, computer systems design and related services added 12,000 jobs.

Employment continued to trend up in architectural and engineering services (+6,000) and in management and technical consulting services (+6,000).

In March, employment in food services and drinking places continued its upward trend (+27,000), in line with its average monthly gain over the prior 12 months.

Employment in construction showed little change in March (+16,000) but has increased by 246,000 over the past 12 months. Manufacturing employment changed little for the second month in a row (-6,000 in March, following +1,000 in February). In the 12 months prior to February, manufacturing had added an average of 22,000 jobs per month. Within the industry, employment in motor vehicles and parts declined in March (-6,000).

The importance of culture at Jacksonville jobs

March 26th, 2019

Culture is proving to be very important when it comes to hiring for Jacksonville jobs, according to a new Careerbuilder study.

The company’s annual study revealed that 40 percent of employers plan to hire full-time, permanent employees in 2019, and 47 percent plan to recruit part-time workers. Hiring for full-time employees and part-time or contract workers is on par with the 2018 report, which was 44 percent and 51 percent last year, respectively.

There is demand for full-time workers, as 50 percent of human resource managers say they currently have open positions for which they cannot find qualified candidates. However, there are candidates ready to take on those roles.

Across all skills levels, 32 percent of workers are looking to change jobs in 2019. When asked why they left their last job, employees cited low compensation or a lack of benefits (15 percent) and poor company culture (10 percent) as the reason for leaving.

Employment and Hiring Trends to Watch in 2019

  • Candidates’ soft skills are increasingly important when applying to jobs. Ninety-two percent of employers say soft skills, including interpersonal skills, communication abilities, and critical thinking, will be important in determining whether they will hire candidates. Eighty percent also said that soft skills would be equally or more important than hard skills when hiring candidates, since specific technical skills are necessary for some jobs. The top skills that employers will be hiring for in 2019 are the ability to be team-oriented (51 percent), attention to detail (49 percent), and customer service (46 percent).
  • Opportunities for job seekers are available year-round. Fifty-one percent of hiring managers recruit throughout the calendar year for positions that may open up later on. Of those who continuously recruit, 55 percent say this reduces their time-to-hire and 42 percent share it reduces cost-per-hire.
  • Companies and job seekers are willing to invest in tech training. Fifty-five percent of employers believe that, on average, 50 percent or more of all jobs include tech requirements, and 56 percent have paid for employees to get skills-based training outside the office, so they can move up to a higher-skill job within their organization. However, 66 percent of employees say their company does not offer educational opportunities or workshops outside of work hours to teach them new skills they could use in their jobs. Of those employees, 73 percent say they would be somewhat or extremely likely to participate if such opportunities were offered.
  • Convenience and culture may be more important than compensation. Employees cite factors like location (56 percent), affordable benefits plans (55 percent), job stability (55 percent), a good boss (48 percent), and good work culture (44 percent) as more important than salary when considering a position.
  • Compensation is on the rise. Twenty-nine percent of employers expect the average increase in salaries for existing employees to be five percent or more in 2019 compared to 2018.

 

Retail jobs in Jacksonville grow

March 7th, 2019

Many more retail jobs in Jacksonville have been added, according to recent labor statistics.

Employment increased by 304,000 in January, and the unemployment rate edged up to 4.0 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

In January, employment grew in several industries, including leisure and hospitality, construction, health care, and transportation and warehousing.

In January, employment in leisure and hospitality rose by 74,000. Within the industry, job gains occurred in food services and drinking places (+37,000) and in amusements, gambling, and recreation (+32,000).

Over the year, leisure and hospitality has added 410,000 jobs. Construction employment rose by 52,000 in January. Job gains occurred among specialty trade contractors, with increases in both the nonresidential (+19,000) and residential (+15,000) components.

Employment also rose in heavy and civil engineering construction (+10,000) and residential building (+9,000). Construction has added 338,000 jobs over the past 12 months. Employment in health care increased by 42,000 in January. Within the industry, job gains occurred in ambulatory health care services (+22,000) and hospitals (+19,000).

Health care has added 368,000 jobs over the past year. Over the month, employment in transportation and warehousing rose by 27,000, following little change in December. In January, job gains occurred in warehousing and storage (+15,000) and among couriers and messengers (+7,000). Over the year, employment in transportation and warehousing has increased by 219,000.

In January, retail trade employment edged up by 21,000. Job gains occurred in sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores (+17,000), while general merchandise stores lost jobs (-12,000).

Employment in retail trade has shown little net change over the past 12 months (+26,000). Mining employment increased by 7,000 in January.

The industry has added 64,000 jobs over the year, almost entirely in support activities for mining. Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up over the month (+30,000) and has increased by 546,000 in the past 12 months.

Employment in manufacturing continued to trend up in January (+13,000). Over-the- month job gains occurred in durable goods (+20,000), while employment in nondurable goods changed little (-7,000). Manufacturing employment has increased by 261,000 over the year, with more than four-fifths of the gain in durable goods industries.

Getting STEM jobs in Jacksonville

February 27th, 2019

Many graduates getting STEM jobs in Jacksonville may see a big difference in their salaries.

Bachelor’s degree graduates earning STEM degrees are expected to earn the highest starting salaries from the college Class of 2019, according to results of a new survey from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

NACE’s Winter 2019 Salary Survey found that graduates with engineering ($69,188), computer science ($67,539), and math and sciences degrees ($62,177) are once again projected to be the top-paid graduates.

Also coming in near the top of the list are business ($57,657) and social sciences ($57,310) majors.

The news is generally positive for Class of 2019 graduates overall at this early juncture in the salary reporting cycle.

All reported disciplines are expected to see gains—albeit relatively small ones—except one and that loss is just -0.1 percent.

Agriculture and natural resources majors are projected to see the greatest gain in starting salary at 4.1 percent.

With an expected increase of 4.0 percent, engineering majors follow closely behind, while the average salary for computer science majors is anticipated to be 2.3 percent more than their counterparts from the Class of 2018.

The Winter 2019 Salary Survey contains annual salary projections for Class of 2019 college graduates. The figures reported are for base salaries only and do not include bonuses, commissions, fringe benefits, or overtime rates.

 

Technologies match job seekers to Jacksonville jobs

February 25th, 2019

A variety of new technologies are available matching Jacksonville jobs to job seekers, according to a recent survey from Careerbuilder.

While the majority of millennial hiring managers (59 percent) strongly agree that technology will reduce recruiters’ roles in their companies’ talent acquisition processes over the next five years, hiring managers across all generations are keen to leverage the data staffing firms can provide, including salary data and industry hiring trends.

In the current market, hiring managers’ primary reasons for working with staffing firms include the desire to shorten the hiring process (42 percent) and access to candidates with specialized skills (41 percent), yet 40 percent of companies maintain recruitment processes in-house to save money.

Additional key findings include:

  • Companies partner with staffing firms to improve and streamline hiring processes, and most are not exclusively partnered with one firm.
    • Fifty-four percent of hiring managers plan to increase their use of staffing firms over the next five years.
    • Hiring managers cite top pain points in the recruitment process as access to candidates with the right skills (52 percent), time to hire (40 percent), and budget (34 percent).
    • Sixty-six percent of hiring managers feel using a staffing firm would be very helpful in gaining access to the right candidates.
    • According to hiring managers, the key reasons for working with staffing firms include that they needed to hire someone more quickly than they could do on their own (42 percent), access to candidates with specialized skills (41 percent), and they had a hard time filling the position on their own (37 percent).
    • The main reasons hiring managers do not work with staffing firms are that they were trying to save money (40 percent), staffing agencies are not hiring the type of positions needed (28 percent), and they believe the best candidates do not work with staffing agencies (26 percent).
  • Staffing firms must be up-to-date on the technology they use.
    • Sixty-seven percent of hiring managers believe it is very or extremely important for their staffing firms to use up-to-date technology.
    • Seventy-four percent of hiring managers believe using up-to-date technology can help differentiate a staffing firm.
    • At staffing firms, leaders cite inconsistent use of systems as their biggest frustration with technologies (31 percent), while at the field level, main frustrations can be attributed to outdated candidate data (29 percent).
    • Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) are ranked as the most valuable technology used by staffing firms (31 percent), followed by social media sites (19 percent) and job boards (15 percent); however, both leadership and field workers at staffing firms believe that ATS technologies are in the most need of improvement.
    • The most common resources used include technologies to match open jobs to potential candidates (45 percent), use of a single search bar to look at multiple third-party resume databases (40 percent), and video or online interviewing capabilities (38 percent).
  • Hiring managers are made aware of new staffing firms through a variety of different sources including the firm’s reputation within their industry (12 percent), proactive recommendations (12 percent), and through experience hiring with the firm at a previous job (12 percent).
    • The primary resources companies use when vetting new staffing firms are similar to how they initially learn about these agencies, and include asking people in their professional networks for referrals (34 percent), the firm’s reputation within the industry (34 percent), and reading the staffing firm’s website (27 percent).
    • Main reasons for selecting a primary staffing firm include the firm’s ability to find specific or niche skill sets (16 percent), strong reputations (15 percent), and the ability to find high quality talent (15 percent).
  • Most staffing firm leaders have seen revenue increases over the past year (66 percent).

Construction jobs in Jacksonville climb

February 9th, 2019

Several more construction jobs in Jacksonville have been added.

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 304,000 in January, and the unemployment rate edged up to 4.0 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

In January, employment in leisure and hospitality rose by 74,000. Within the industry, job gains occurred in food services and drinking places (+37,000) and in amusements, gambling, and recreation (+32,000). Over the year, leisure and hospitality has added 410,000 jobs.

Construction employment rose by 52,000 in January. Job gains occurred among specialty trade contractors, with increases in both the nonresidential (+19,000) and residential (+15,000) components.

Employment also rose in heavy and civil engineering construction (+10,000) and residential building (+9,000). Construction has added 338,000 jobs over the past 12 months. Employment in health care increased by 42,000 in January.

Within the industry, job gains occurred in ambulatory health care services (+22,000) and hospitals (+19,000). Health care has added 368,000 jobs over the past year.

Over the month, employment in transportation and warehousing rose by 27,000, following little change in December. In January, job gains occurred in warehousing and storage (+15,000) and among couriers and messengers (+7,000). Over the year, employment in transportation and warehousing has increased by 219,000.

In January, retail trade employment edged up by 21,000. Job gains occurred in sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores (+17,000), while general merchandise stores lost jobs (-12,000). Employment in retail trade has shown little net change over the past 12 months (+26,000).

Mining employment increased by 7,000 in January. The industry has added 64,000 jobs over the year, almost entirely in support activities for mining. Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up over the month (+30,000) and has increased by 546,000 in the past 12 months.