Rental car company may hire for Jacksonville management jobs

July 8th, 2018

Enterprise Rent-A-Car may soon be hiring for Jacksonville management jobs.

More than 5,800 Enterprise Rent-A-Car locations throughout the U.S. plan to hire 8,500 college graduates into the renowned Enterprise Management Training program and 2,000 interns into the Management Internship program this year. And for the first time, ties are not required.

Enterprise Holdings Inc. operates the Enterprise Rent-A-Car brand, as well as National Car Rental and Alamo Rent A Car, through its integrated global network of independent regional subsidiaries and franchises. These regional subsidiaries employ 100,000 worldwide.

In fiscal year 2017 alone, Enterprise Holdings grew total revenues 6.5 percent to $22.3 billion and expanded its network to include 9,900 fully staffed neighborhood and airport locations in more than 90 countries throughout the world.

Enterprise’s total revenues have more than doubled during the last decade along with overall fleet size – now nearly 1.9 million vehicles. In addition, since 2007, the company has grown its share of the U.S. airport market 10 percentage points.

To support this growth, Enterprise branch offices hire thousands of college-educated, career-oriented men and women into the Enterprise Management Training program each year.

This program teaches employees how to run a business, empower teams and provide face-to-face customer service. Other hallmarks of the program include extensive training in a wide range of business skills, including profit and loss management, business-to-business marketing and sales, and operational logistics.

New grants may affect Jacksonville jobs

July 8th, 2018

A number of new grants may affect the workforce at large, including those with Jacksonville jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor announced the availability of $20 million in grants to help Americans who are injured or ill remain in or return to the workforce. The grants are intended to identify new, replicable strategies to help individuals with a work-related disability stay on the job.

“America’s workforce is strengthened by the participation of all Americans. After an injury or illness, it is critical for workers to have the ability to return to the labor force as quickly as possible,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta. “These grants will help develop innovative strategies that enable injured or ill Americans to return to work so they can support themselves and provide for their families.”

The grants represent the first phase of funding for Retaining Employment and Talent After Injury/Illness Network (RETAIN) Demonstration Projects, which will be administered by the Department’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), in partnership with the Department’s Employment and Training Administration  and the Social Security Administration (SSA).

Successful applicants will propose coordinated employment and health services through an integrated network of partners, including state and/or local workforce development agencies; health-care systems and/or provider networks; and other strategic partners, such as employers or insurers.

The Department anticipates awarding up to eight grants of approximately $2.5 million each to be spent over an 18-month period for planning and start-up activities, including the launch of a small pilot demonstration. Near the conclusion of this first phase, the Department anticipates competitively awarding up to four of the Phase One grantees with additional funding up to approximately $19.5 million each to implement their demonstration projects at full scale. The Department anticipates Phase Two will span 42 months, including 30 months for project implementation and 12 for closeout and final assessment activities. The SSA will administer an independent evaluation of the RETAIN projects.

Is it cold or hot at Jacksonville jobs?

June 26th, 2018

The fight is on about the temperature of Jacksonville healthcare jobs.

Office temperature is causing workers to turn on each other and is also having an impact on productivity. According to a new CareerBuilder survey, nearly half of workers (46 percent) say their office is either too hot or too cold — and 51 percent say sitting in an office that is too cold impacts their productivity, 67 percent say sitting in an office that is too warm does the same.

Fifteen percent of workers say they have argued with a coworker about office temperature (7 percent of men vs. 22 percent of women), and nearly 1 in 5 (19 percent) have secretly changed the office temperature during the summer—13 percent to make it cooler, 6 percent to make it warmer.

Broken down by industry, retail has the hottest employees, and health care has the coldest.

Top sectors with office temperature that is too hot

  • Retail: 28 percent1
  • Manufacturing: 23 percent2
  • Health care: 19 percent

Top sectors with office temperature that is too cold

  • Health care: 30 percent
  • Retail 24 percent3
  • Manufacturing: 18 percent4

Instead of fighting for control over the thermostat, some workers are taking matters into their own hands. To stay at a comfortable temperature at work during the summer, workers say they:

  • Drink cool beverages: 42 percent
  • Dress in layers: 27 percent
  • Use a personal fan: 26 percent
  • Drink hot beverages: 20 percent
  • Wear a jacket all day: 19 percent
  • Use a space heater: 13 percent
  • Use a blanket: 6 percent

Lowe’s hiring for retail jobs in Jacksonville

June 6th, 2018

Lowe’s is hiring big for the spring and summer season and may be hiring for retail jobs in Jacksonville.

Lowe’s is hiring more than 53,000 full-time, part-time and seasonal employees across its U.S. stores, adding to the company’s nearly 250,000 current U.S. store employees.

In-store seasonal positions, which typically support stores between March and September, include cashiers, lawn and garden associates, stockers, assemblers of outdoor products and loaders. Lowe’s seasonal employees benefit from competitive pay, a 10 percent employee discount and flexible hours, including the ability to see their schedule 17 days in advance and swap shifts with others as needed.

Available part-time and full-time positions include service and support managers, customer service associates, cashiers, stockers and sales specialists. Part-time and full-time employees can take advantage of Lowe’s health and wellness benefits, incentive programs, 401(k), a discounted stock purchase plan, tuition reimbursement and flexible work schedules.

In 2017, for the third consecutive year, 100 percent of Lowe’s 1,700-plus U.S. stores served their communities through a Lowe’s Heroes volunteer community project – from restoring parks to improving schools.
• In the aftermath of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, in addition to the company’s $2.5 million donation to disaster relief, more than 3,000 store employees volunteered to provide necessary support to impacted stores and communities.
• Lowe’s full-time employees can take advantage of the company’s paid time off for community volunteering each year.

Are healthcare jobs in Jacksonville being cut?

June 5th, 2018

Some healthcare jobs in Jacksonville may be on the chopping block, according to recent statistics from Challenger, Gray & Christmas.

Last month’s job cuts were down 4.8 percent from the 33,092 announced in the same month last year. That is the lowest monthly total since October 2017, when 29,831 cuts were announced.

“On average, job cuts are at their lowest in May and June. Companies typically make their staffing moves at the beginning of the year or in the fourth quarter,” said John Challenger, Chief Executive Officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

So far this year, employers have announced 207,977 job cuts, 6.2 percent more than the 195,895 announced through the first five months of 2017.

Retail leads all sectors in job cuts this year, with 69,316, 4,946 of which occurred in May. Retailers have announced 24 percent more cuts than through the same period last year, when 55,910 cuts were announced.

So far this year, Challenger has tracked 2,565 store closures.

Health Care/Products companies announced the second highest number of job cuts in May, with 4,003, for a total of 21,453 this year. Companies in the Services sector announced 19,363 cuts, with 4,698 in May.

Staying cool at Jacksonville manufacturing jobs

May 27th, 2018

Battles are being waged over the temperature at Jacksonville manufacturing jobs, according to a recent Careerbuilder survey.

According to the survey,  nearly half of workers (46 percent) say their office is either too hot or too cold — and 51 percent say sitting in an office that is too cold impacts their productivity, 67 percent say sitting in an office that is too warm does the same.

Fifteen percent of workers say they have argued with a coworker about office temperature (7 percent of men vs. 22 percent of women), and nearly 1 in 5 (19 percent) have secretly changed the office temperature during the summer—13 percent to make it cooler, 6 percent to make it warmer.

Instead of fighting for control over the thermostat, some workers are taking matters into their own hands. To stay at a comfortable temperature at work during the summer, workers say they:

  • Drink cool beverages: 42 percent
  • Dress in layers: 27 percent
  • Use a personal fan: 26 percent
  • Drink hot beverages: 20 percent
  • Wear a jacket all day: 19 percent
  • Use a space heater: 13 percent
  • Use a blanket: 6 percent

Three Ways to Keep Your Cool in Extreme Temperatures
Take action with the following tips, and create a working environment that is neither too hot nor too cold, but just right.

Agree to this degree: As much as it might feel easier to simply change the thermostat behind your co-workers’ backs, a more effective resolution might be to try talking to your co-workers about it and find a compromise.

Take breaks: It’s summer, so enjoy the sun and a little vitamin D. Even if your office temperature isn’t bothering you, a quick break is always a good idea to boost productivity.

Are youth jobs in Jacksonville decreasing?

May 8th, 2018

A new report from Challenger, Gray, & Christmas show that youth jobs in Jacksonville may be declining.

Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. predicts teen hiring will remain stagnant this summer, as more and more teens focus on education, family obligations, and extracurricular activities.

Although over 1 million teens found jobs in June of last year, the strongest hiring numbers for this cohort since 2007, teen hiring fell nearly 4 percent last summer to 1,288,000 jobs gained, according to an analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics by Challenger.

Employment among workers aged 16 to 19 was 190,000 in July, the lowest July total on record. That is 61.4 percent lower than the 492,000 job gains in July 2016.

Last year’s summer total was the lowest number of job gains since 2015, when 1,160,000 teens found positions.

“Some of these declines could be due to the pivot in retail, which is leading to thousands of store closures. In March, Toys“R”Us, a large employer of teens, announced they were closing all of their U.S. stores. Since January 2017, Challenger has tracked over 5,000 announced closures of retail locations,” said Andrew Challenger, Vice President of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

“However, teen employment has been falling steadily since the 90s and especially since the recession. The teen participation rate in the summer months has hovered near 40 percent since 2009, well below the highs of the 70s, 80s, and 90s at near or over 60 percent,” he added.

Healthcare jobs in Jacksonville burgeon

May 7th, 2018

The latest labor statistics demonstrate that healthcare jobs in Jacksonville are climbing.

Payroll employment increased by 164,000 in April, and the unemployment rate edged down to 3.9 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

In April, job gains occurred in professional and business services, manufacturing, health care, and mining.

In April, employment in professional and business services increased by 54,000. Over the past 12 months, the industry has added 518,000 jobs. Employment in manufacturing increased by 24,000 in April.

Most of the gain was in the durable goods component, with machinery adding 8,000 jobs and employment in fabricated metal products continuing to trend up (+4,000).

Manufacturing employment has risen by 245,000 over the year, with about three-fourths of the growth in durable goods industries. Health care added 24,000 jobs in April and 305,000 jobs over the year.

In April, employment rose in ambulatory health care services (+17,000) and hospitals (+8,000). In April, employment in mining increased by 8,000, with most of the gain occurring in support activities for mining (+7,000).

Since a recent low in October 2016, employment in mining has risen by 86,000.

Employment changed little over the month in other major industries, including construction, wholesale trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities, leisure and hospitality, and government.

Late for Jacksonville jobs?

April 27th, 2018

Some employees at Jacksonville jobs may have given strange excuses for being late for work.

According to a new CareerBuilder survey, when asked how often they come in late to work, 1 in 4 workers (25 percent) admitted they do it at least once a month — down from 29 percent last year — and more than 1 in 10 (12 percent) say it’s a weekly occurrence for them.

Broken down by age, 38 percent of those ages 18-34 are late at least once a month, compared to 36 percent of those 35-44 and 14 percent of those 45 and older. By region, 30 percent of workers from the West are late at least once a month, compared to only 26 percent in the Northeast, 25 percent in the South and 23 percent in the Midwest.

Some people have more unusual excuses for being late. When asked about the most outrageous excuses employees have given them for being late, employers shared the following:

  • It’s too cold to work.
  • I had morning sickness (it was a man).
  • My coffee was too hot and I couldn’t leave until it cooled off.
  • An astrologer warned me of a car accident on a major highway, so I took all backroads, making me an hour late.
  • My dog ate my work schedule.
  • I was here, but I fell asleep in the parking lot.
  • My fake eyelashes were stuck together.
  • Although it has been five years, I forgot I did not work at my former employer’s location and drove there on accident.

In general, the usual suspects are to blame for why employees are late to work: traffic (51 percent), oversleeping (31 percent), bad weather (28 percent), too tired to get out of bed (23 percent) and forgetting something (13 percent).

Jacksonville nurse practitioner jobs among the best in the nation

April 8th, 2018

A new survey demonstrates that Jacksonville nurse practitioner jobs, among other locations, rank among some of the best in the country.

Software Developer takes the No. 1 spot as the Best Job overall. Dentist ranks at No. 2, followed by physician assistant at No. 3 and nurse practitioner at No. 4. This is the first time since 2015 that a health care job has not topped the list, though health care positions continue to dominate the 2018 rankings due to a combination of high salaries and low unemployment rates. In addition to taking 47 of the 100 Best Jobs, the majority of the Best-Paying Jobs are also in health care. With an average salary of $269,600, anesthesiologist tops the list, followed by surgeon at No. 2 and obstetrician and gynecologist at No. 3.

“Health care jobs are prominent on our list year after year and are predicted to continue growing rapidly within the job market by 2026,” said Rebecca Koenig, careers reporter at U.S. News. “Health care goes beyond doctors and nursing professions – there is high demand for people to fill positions available in health care technology, at hospitals and elsewhere within the industry that tap into a variety of the categories we rank and that offer a low unemployment rate, a high median salary and robust job growth.”

100 Best Jobs
1. Software Developer
2. Dentist
3. Physician Assistant
4. Nurse Practitioner
5. Orthodontist

Best-Paying Jobs
1. Anesthesiologist
2. Surgeon
3. Obstetrician and Gynecologist
4. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
5. Orthodontist

Best Health Care Jobs
1. Dentist
2. Physician Assistant
3. Nurse Practitioner
4. Orthodontist
5. Pediatrician

Best Business Jobs
1. Statistician
2. Actuary
3. Mathematician
4. Cost Estimator
5. Business Operations Manager