Company hires for customer service jobs in Jacksonville

October 7th, 2017

Walmart, the retail giant, has pledged to give their employees more hours, which will affect customer service jobs in Jacksonville.

Judith McKenna, executive vice president and chief operating officer, Walmart U.S, said:

“The holidays are a special time of year for our customers and associates and also one of the busiest. To help customers save time and money this season, we are offering the extra hours available this time of year to our current associates rather than hiring thousands of seasonal workers.

“These extra hours will help staff traditional roles like cashier and stocker, and newly created technology-empowered positions such as personal shoppers and Pickup associates. This is the same approach we took last year, and we heard great feedback from our customers and associates.

“This is what working in retail is all about, and we know our associates have the passion to do even more this year. We’ve increased our focus on service through new training, tools and technology. Thousands of associates have completed training in our Pathways and Academy programs, which prepares them to more effectively serve customers, especially during this busy season.

“We are also bringing back the very popular Holiday Helper and increasing the number of Helpers we have in stores this season. These associates are dedicated to helping customers get through the stores faster by finding the shortest checkout line, opening registers as needed and will even quickly grab items customers might have forgotten.

“Our associates make the holidays come to life in our stores, and we are thankful for everything they do to help our customers have the best possible shopping experience. As we head into our busiest time of the year, we know associates are ready to deliver for our customers and help give them a memorable and affordable Christmas.”

Company raising wages may affect Jacksonville retail jobs

October 6th, 2017

Target has made a big announcement that may affect some Jacksonville retail jobs.

The company announced plans to raise its minimum hourly wage for all team members to $11 in October, along with a commitment to increasing the minimum hourly wage to $15 by the end of 2020. This significant investment in its team will allow Target to continue to recruit and retain strong team members and provide an elevated experience for its guests and in the communities it serves.

“Target has a long history of investing in our team members. We care about and value the more than 323,000 individuals who come together every day with an absolute commitment to serving our guest,” said Brian Cornell, CEO and chairman of Target. “Target has always offered market competitive wages to our team members. With this latest commitment, we’ll be providing even more meaningful pay, as well as the tools, training and support our team needs to build their skills, develop professionally and offer the service and expertise that set Target apart.”

By moving to an $11 minimum hourly wage this fall, Target will provide pay increases to thousands of team members across the country before the holiday season. This increase will also apply to the more than 100,000 hourly team members that Target is hiring for the holiday season. The commitment to move to a minimum hourly wage of $15 will be implemented between now and the end of 2020.

Target currently pays market competitive rates above the federal minimum wage at all stores nationwide. Target’s last major wage increase was in 2016, when the company moved to a $10 minimum hourly wage. A minimum hourly wage of $11 is higher than the minimum wage in 48 states, and matches the minimum wage in Massachusetts and Washington.

Additionally, Target offers a variety of schedules to meet the needs of its diverse population and works with its teams to build schedules around their availability. With input from its team members, Target posts store schedules in advance, allows store team members to trade and pick up shifts at their store location, and doesn’t do on-call or snap scheduling at its stores.

Nursing care jobs in Jacksonville may have declined

October 6th, 2017

New labor statistics may show that nursing care jobs in Jacksonville have declined.

Employment was little changed in September (-33,000), after adding an average  of 172,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In September, a steep employment decline in food services and drinking places and below-trend growth in some other industries likely reflected the  impact of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey. Employment rose in health care and in transportation and  warehousing.

Employment in food services and drinking places dropped sharply in September (-105,000), as many  workers were off payrolls due to the recent hurricanes. Over the prior 12 months, food services  and drinking places had added an average of 24,000 jobs per month.

In September, health care added 23,000 jobs, in line with its average monthly gain over the prior  12 months (+27,000). The employment increase in ambulatory health care services (+25,000) was partially offset by a decline in nursing care facilities (-9,000).

Employment in transportation and warehousing increased by 22,000 in September. Job gains occurred in warehousing and storage (+5,000), couriers and messengers (+4,000), and air transportation (+3,000).

Employment in financial activities changed little in September (+10,000). A job gain in insurance  carriers and related activities (+11,000) largely reflected hurricane-recovery efforts. The gain was  partly offset by losses in activities related to credit intermediation (-4,000) and in commercial banking (-3,000). Over the year, financial activities has added 149,000 jobs.

In September, employment in professional and business services was little changed (+13,000). Over the prior 12 months, job growth in the industry had averaged 50,000 per month.

Manufacturing employment was essentially unchanged in September (-1,000). From a recent employment trough in November 2016 through August of this year, the industry had added an average of 14,000 jobs per month.

Employment in other major industries, including mining, construction, wholesale trade, retail trade, information, and government, showed little change over the month.

Were some Jacksonville jobs cut?

September 9th, 2017

A recent report from Challenger, Gray & Christmas discusses job cuts across the country, where Jacksonville jobs may have been reduced.

U.S.-based employers announced plans to cut payrolls by 33,825 in August, a 19.4 percent increase from the 28,307 recorded cuts announced in July.

The August job-cut total is 5 percent higher than the same month last year, when 32,188 cuts were recorded. This month’s total marks the first increase in job cuts in the past five months of this year. Job cuts have declined each month of this year following the announcement of 43,310 payroll cuts in March.
So far this year, employers announced 289,132 planned job cuts, down 26.1 percent from the 391,288 cuts announced through the first eight months of 2016.

“Although job cuts have risen this month, they continue to be significantly lower compared to the same time last year,” said John Challenger, Chief Executive Officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

“Although we have seen high layoffs in retail with store closings and some companies filing for bankruptcy, there has also been increased hiring in new areas of the sector as retailers build out their e-commerce platforms. Shipping and technology jobs are expanding and going unfilled. We are seeing a labor market in which skilled technical and logistics/supply chain talent is in high demand,” said Challenger.

Retail continues to lead all sectors this year, with 67,596 announced cuts, 3,607 in August. Retail job cuts are 51.4 percent higher this year than through the same point last year, when 44,643 retail cuts were announced.
The construction industry announced the highest number of job cuts in August, with 4,332. Companies in the financial sector cut 3,414 jobs in August, for an eight-month total of 10,799. The services industry announced 3,039 cuts in August, bringing that sector’s total to 21,061.

Manufacturing jobs in Jacksonville climb

September 4th, 2017

New statistics recently published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics demonstrate that manufacturing jobs in Jacksonville are climbing.

Employment increased by 156,000 in August, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 4.4 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

Payroll employment increased by 156,000 in August. Job gains occurred in manufacturing, construction, professional and technical services, health care, and mining. Employment growth has averaged 176,000 per month thus far this year, about in line with the average monthly gain of 187,000 in 2016.

Manufacturing employment rose by 36,000 in August. Job gains occurred in motor vehicles and parts (+14,000), fabricated metal products (+5,000), and computer and electronic products (+4,000). Manufacturing has added 155,000 jobs since a recent employment low in November 2016.

In August, construction employment rose by 28,000, after showing little change over the prior 5 months. Employment among residential specialty trade contractors edged up by 12,000 over the month. Employment in professional and technical services continued to trend up in August (+22,000) and has grown by 262,000 over the last 12 months.

In August, job gains occurred in computer systems design and related services (+8,000). Health care employment continued on an upward trend over the month (+20,000) and has risen by 328,000 over the year. Employment in hospitals edged up over the month (+6,000).

Mining continued to add jobs in August (+7,000), with all of the growth in support activities for mining. Since a recent low in October 2016, employment in mining has risen by 62,000, or 10 percent.

Employment in other major industries, including wholesale trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities, and government, showed little change over the month.

Will grants help Jacksonville jobs?

August 30th, 2017

A number of grants have been awarded, and some may affect Jacksonville jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor announced $80 million in grants will be awarded to YouthBuild, a pre-apprenticeship program for at-risk individuals ages 16-to-24.

“There are pathways to successful careers outside of traditional education models,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta. “There are 6.2 million open jobs in the U.S., including 228,000 in construction, and 388,000 in manufacturing. By partnering with local community colleges and nonprofits, we can empower America’s young people with the skills to succeed in the good-paying jobs of today and of the future.”

YouthBuild is a recognized pre-apprenticeship program that helps at-risk youth complete high school or state equivalency degree programs, earn industry-recognized certifications for in-demand occupations, and undergo training to build housing for low-income or homeless individuals and families in their communities.

The grants announced today range from approximately $650,000 to $1.1 million each, and will help fund 77 YouthBuild programs.

YouthBuild has a network of 260 urban and rural YouthBuild programs in 46 states.

It partners with the Department of Labor and is sponsored and managed by local nonprofits, community colleges, and public agencies.

 

Are Jacksonville jobs some of the best in the country?

August 8th, 2017

A new list from Indeed.com highlights how Jacksonville jobs may be some of the best in the country.

According to the list, three of the top ten metro areas are in Florida, with Miami topping the list (#1), followed by Orlando (#2), and Jacksonville (#7). All of the top 15 metros on the list are in the south and west regions of the country.

A stronger labor market affords many opportunities for job seekers right now and is allowing for more lifestyle considerations to influence their job search. As such, Indeed created the “25 Best Cities for Job Seekers” list by analyzing U.S metro areas with the most job postings according to four categories: job market favorability, salary weighted for cost of living, and employee rankings for work/life balance and job security and advancement opportunities.

“The Sun Belt continues to be a region of high-growth and opportunity as companies and workers alike have moved toward strong job markets,” said Paul D’Arcy, senior vice president at Indeed. “We have seen a migration trend where people are moving away from cold places looking to live in warm climates, so it is no surprise that we are seeing companies providing more job opportunities in Sun Belt cities like Miami, Austin, and San Diego.”

Miami and South Florida serves as U.S. headquarters for Latin American operations for hundreds multinational corporations including Disney, American Airlines, Cisco, Exxon, Microsoft, Kraft Foods, Oracle, Sony, Visa International, and more, adding to a robust job market.

According to Indeed data, the Miami metro area work/life balance and job security/advancement ratings by employees are ranked highest.

The high marks for employee satisfaction coupled with job market favorability and salary/cost of living brought Miami to the top of Indeed’s “Best Cities for Job Seekers” list.

Food service jobs in Jacksonville climb

August 4th, 2017

The number of food service jobs in Jacksonville have burgeoned.

The unemployment rate was little changed at 4.3 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. Employment increased in food services and drinking places, professional and business services, and health care.

Employment increased by 209,000 in July. Job gains occurred in food services and drinking places, professional and business services, and health care.

Employment growth has averaged 184,000 per month thus far this year, in line with the average monthly gain in 2016 (+187,000).

Employment in food services and drinking places rose by 53,000 in July. The industry has added 313,000 jobs over the year. Professional and business services added 49,000 jobs in July, in line with its average monthly job gain over the prior 12 months.

In July, health care employment increased by 39,000, with job gains occurring in ambulatory health care services (+30,000) and hospitals (+7,000). Health care has added 327,000 jobs over the past year. Employment in mining was essentially unchanged in July (+1,000).

Both the unemployment rate, at 4.3 percent, and the number of unemployed persons, at 7.0 million, changed little in July. After declining earlier in the year, the unemployment rate has shown little movement in recent months.

Funding may go towards training for Jacksonville jobs

July 31st, 2017

Funds from the Department of Labor may go towards training and Jacksonville jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced the availability of $10.5 million in Susan Harwood Training Grantsto fund training and education for workers and employers to help them identify and prevent workplace safety and health hazards.

The grants are available for nonprofit organizations including community and faith-based organizations, employer associations, labor unions, joint labor/management associations, Indian tribes, and colleges and universities.

Recipients will create in-person, hands-on training and educational programs and develop materials for workers and employers in small businesses; industries with high injury, illness and fatality rates; and vulnerable workers who are underserved, have limited English proficiency or are temporary workers.

Targeted Topic Training grants are available to support the development of quality training programs and educational materials that focus on identifying and preventing workplace hazards.

This funding opportunity announcement also makes available funds for Training and Educational Materials Development grants that focus on developing quality training materials.

Healthcare jobs in Jacksonville grow

July 8th, 2017

More healthcare jobs in Jacksonville are being added, according to recent labor statistics.

Employment increased by 222,000 in June, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 4.4 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

Employment rose in health care, social assistance, financial activities, and mining.

Employment growth has averaged 180,000 per month thus far this year, in line with the average monthly gain of 187,000 in 2016.

In June, health care added 37,000 jobs. Employment increased in ambulatory health care services (+26,000) and hospitals (+12,000). Health care has added an average of 24,000 jobs per month in the first half of 2017, compared with a monthly average of 32,000 jobs in 2016. Social assistance employment increased by 23,000 in June.

Within the industry, employment continued to trend up in individual and family services (+12,000) and in child day care services (+8,000).

Social assistance has added 115,000 jobs over the last 12 months. Employment in financial activities rose by 17,000 in June and has grown by 169,000 over the year. Securities, commodity contracts, and investments added 5,000 jobs over the month.

In June, mining employment grew by 8,000, with most of the growth in support activities for mining (+7,000).

Since a recent employment low in October 2016, mining has added 56,000 jobs. Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up in June (+35,000) and has grown by 624,000 over the last 12 months.